Family at breaking point.

Oliver is 6. He was diagnosed with autism 4 years ago. I struggled at first to accept it- how and why did it happen again, but that couldn’t last because he needed me ready to help him and fight for him and just love him. And I do. Max was diagnosed 20 years ago so maybe it helped that I knew what I was doing this time around. My family is now in the verge of breaking up because after four years, Oliver’s dad will not accept the autism or change his approach.

He’s not a bad man. Olly was his first child and he had such expectations that he thinks now will not come to pass. He doesn’t understand how Oliver sees the world, how he learns, when he’s just being a swine, the difference between meltdown and tantrum etc. Things I’ve had to learn so that I can help him achieve everything he wants to. I’ve modelled the discipline model, I’ve shown the speech therapy techniques, I’ve shown him how to play with children, I’ve talked to him, I’ve offered him counselling and helpline numbers and I don’t know what else I can do. Treating him like his sister will not make him like his sister, but he doesn’t get this.

The last couple of months have been so bad, I feel like I’m alone raising this family. If something happens it’s me having to referee and sort out the fall out. There’s constant arguments with him saying “I’m entitled to be angry” and me saying “you have to see through his eyes. Anger is no good anymore, it’s driving us all away”. Shouting at kids doesn’t work in this house. Loud, sudden noises make a situation escalate so fast. I’ve been saying the same things for 4 years and he’s just not listening.

Oliver shut down last week. I’d never seen it and I do not want to see it again. The playmobil pool was filled with water and Olly went to tip it. Olly and water is always a risky combination. Dad shouted “No” so Olly went to do it again. “I Said NO!” And then the pool got tipped. “NO MEANS NO!” So Olly ran into the living room and I followed as if he gets told off he will throw something or tip something. He was shaking. I tried to talk to him but he lay on the sofa covered his ears and closed his eyes. He shut out everything. I stroked his back and murmured to him. He lay there for a good while and I just let him calm himself until he was ready to let me in. Eventually he sat up and dad came in to see him but he just clung to me. And that was the point I told him to get help or go.

It may seem harsh but it’s been four years. He’s missing out on important things while being angry. I understand the frustration of dealing with our boys at times, the behaviour and lack of sleep is not a good combination. I understand any kid winding up their parents at times, hell, no one is perfect. I’m nowhere near perfect but I try every day to do the best I can, to learn, adapt, make learning fun, picking which battles are worth the fight. He refuses to adapt. I asked him if he thinks acceptance means giving up and he said yes. I disagreed. I think acceptance means you can open up to more ideas, different worlds, different rules. We aren’t like other families so why should we try to fit in with their “normal”? Why can’t we make our own normal? Why can’t we embrace our differences? We can think outside the box of norms to make life fun. If we keep trying to force our kids into a blue print they can’t fit what kind of parent does that make us?

If anyone has any constructive ideas on how he can move on it would be helpful. Coming from me the words are falling on deaf ears. We can’t carry on living in this angry fug. It’s not good for anyone especially the kids. If you do care to leave a comment please know that bashing him won’t help the situation. I can’t help him. He just throws that I’ve had 20 years to deal with this and he’s only had four. When max was diagnosed I was a single parent with no family back up so I didn’t have the luxury of wallowing. The boys don’t need fixing, they’re not broken. I don’t know how to change this mindset. We have to get through Christmas and then I suppose we will sort out the future. Over the last four years we’ve had the chats, discussions and arguments but nothing really changes. I’ve asked him how I can help, what he needs, how I can make it better, tried to support and be understanding but with no movement I can’t continue to do this. I’m not helping at all and I’m so tired of going over and over the same ground. I’m done. 😞

Xx

Olobob Top.

Olobob Top was created by Leigh Hodgkinson and Steve Smith.  It is a programme currently shown on Cbeebies aimed at pre-schoolers.  I knew nothing about it until May this year when Oliver’s TA came out of school with him and told me about this “bigtop hill thing” programme he’d found on the computer.  It had apparently amused him no end so she was going to find the proper name and make a card so he could put it on his “working for” board.

Now I know that sounds nothing in itself, kids go through phases but let me expand.  From age 2 Oliver went to a private nursery.  He stayed there (3 sessions a week to help socialisation) until he started reception class.  He never brought me a picture home.  Never painted anything for me.  In almost 4 years I never got a painted picture, a drawing or even a scribble.  I asked school not to send home teacher made things like mother’s day cards unless he’d done it because what’s the point? That’s a personal choice, if others want them then that’s fine, what works for me doesn’t work for everyone.  It hurt a little especially as Popples was painting mad and my cupboards were full of her pictures, except a space I’d saved – just in case.  The day after Mrs D (TA) had told me about this thing he’d found on the computer I went to pick him up as usual and she came out smiling.  “Show mummy” she said to him and he presented me with this printout of a scene from Olobob Top (yes she found the right name) that he’d created himself.  He pointed to something and whispered “Tib” so I repeated it and praised his beautiful creation.  He looked quite pleased.  We showed it to Popples, I took a photo and sent it to his dad at work.  I found the blue tac and stuck it up.  He had made it!

The next day he came out again and he was smiling and Mrs D was practically bouncing. He handed me 2 sheets of paper and said “olobob top”.  I looked and almost cried- they were paintings!  not only paintings, but you could actually see 3 different figures and they were recognisable as Tib, Lalloo and Bobble.  This was the start of a new chapter for him.  Usually uncooperative at craft time, he painted, he crayoned, he drew on the conservatory walls (who cares it’ll wash) he made play doh models, he made characters out of stickle bricks and he verbally requested “computer”.  He often speaks in a whisper but some words were getting louder.

The biggest thing was reading.  I know I’ve talked about Julia Donaldson’s books allowing me to spend quiet times with him, but things changed when Mrs D gave him 2 books for his summer gift.  These were his books, they had his name in them.  One was a sticker book, and the other was a flap book.  He doesn’t like stickers.  I tried to show him the stickers go in the book to make scenes but I got screamed at “NO MUMMY! IT’S MINE!” ok fair enough.  He took his books upstairs out of my reach.  That night my husband put Max to bed and when he came down he told me that Oliver was currently sticking stickers all over his bedroom.  He didn’t know what to do because he doesn’t do stickers so I went up and said “what are you doing?” “Sticking” was the response – TO A QUESTION! “Sticking olobob top” he expanded while I stood looking at the stickers on the carpet, duvet, wall, pillows and chest of drawers.  “That is fabulous sticking! You are so clever. It’s beautiful. Well done!” The pride on his face nearly made me weep.  The I got invited onto the bed to look at the flap book.  I tried opening it but it got pulled away so I sat back and let him lead.  Eventually he moved it to within eyesight and pointed to the figures naming them.  He’d point, say the name then look me in the eye (we don’t demand eye contact in this house) and wait for me to repeat it. Then he’s nod and reconfirm.

Our next reading session was instigated by him.  He pointed to a pink bird on the cover and said “BIG” but I thought he said pink so I said “Pink”.  He shook his head, and I thought I was going to lose him, he doesn’t like it if I don’t get it straightaway.  He sat there and repeated it but we were having a miscommunication.  Eventually he took his finger and ‘drew’ the letter b on the bed, then I then g.  Light dawned “oh Big! big bird”. He then turned the book over, pointed to another bird and said “little” I repeated it then he pointed to another bird and said “small”.  I didn’t know he knew that word! We were having a conversation.  He was waiting for me to repeat, giving me eye contact and being in charge.  I didn’t touch the book.

Every day he was saying “upstairs, Olobob Top book” and we were reading the way he wanted to.  He was gaining in confidence and trusting me not to take over and let him lead me for a change.  One day he pointed to Tib and said “it’s Bobble” so I copied and said the same, he looked at me and burst out laughing and said “it’s not Bobble, it’s Tib” oh dear, silly mummy.  And that was the game that session, making mummy look a fool! But it paid off because the next day he finally opened the book and I got to see the inside, but just the first page. “Lalloo’s dress” so I added the word spotty. “Tib’s pants” so I added the word stripy.  Expanding his vocabulary with no pressure for him to say it back, just giving him a word he might not have but if he chooses not to use it at that time that’s fine.  He told me shapes, fish, trees, the other characters.  If we are making stuff he says “you could make it up” and gets stuck in.  He also has expanded his wardrobe thanks to Tib’s stripy pants, which is lucky as he ripped the bum out of his tartan ones swinging on his curtain pole, and all his other jammies were stripy.

2 more books were released (and bought), although I’ve not proved myself worthy enough to be able to read Norbert’s shop yet I live in hope 🙂 We were talking about Christmas with Popples and he came over and said “Olobob top toys, yes, Christmas” so I had to tell him there were no toys which we confirmed by googling, so he asked for “dvd yes” and again I had to show him there wasn’t any. He did his sad face but quickly rallied and asked for Go jetters instead.  They have a laptop where he goes on and plays games, makes characters and scenes etc.  He asks for it “computer cbeebies” or whatever he is after that day.  He chooses to read with me, he does crafts, he has taken a passion of his and instead of it being confined to one repetitive game or action, he has brought it into more aspects of his life.  He hums when he is doing things now, he talks quietly to himself (still a lot of jabber but some words) when playing, he seeks me out to do things instead of me having to instigate it, he knows his choices are important now.  They always were but I don’t think he knew that.  Now he knows if he wants to talk about the size of birds for half an hour, then mummy will stay and have as much enthusiasm at the end as at the start.  I know there is a long, long way to go.  I know that I may never have a conversation with him that runs along more conventional lines.  I know his language is still miles behind.  I know the sound of his voice, I know his laughter, I know he can joke, I know he is clever, I know that what he gives is the best he can and I know that’s enough. He’s calmer, he’s more patient and he’s more willing to try new things.

I got a painting off my son.  He was 6 and I got his first painting.  That was enough, everything else that has happened is a bonus.  We were lucky he found something he felt so strongly about that he wanted to share.  I know that Leigh Hodgkinson, Steve Smith and the Olobob’s don’t realise the world they’ve opened to my son has helped him, and us, so much.  Thank you

xx

First theatre trip.

As we didn’t get to see any shows in Butlins, I booked tickets for my youngest to see “What the ladybird heard” live at the Lowry theatre. I love the theatre. I’ve tried ballet and opera but wasn’t keen at all. The cinema is overpriced and very loud. The theatre can be quite expensive so I don’t get to go much. My eldest got me tickets to see War of the Worlds live show a couple years ago and it was excellent. I also saw View from a Bridge at the Royal Exchange.

The Lowry is a lovely small theatre and it’s accessible via public transport which makes life easier. It’s accessible and has all kinds of accessible viewings, bsl, relaxed performances etc. So it’s great for families and those with special/additional needs.

We were in the Quays Theatre. We bought some sweets and a drink and a ladybird leaf and went to find our seats. She was so excited the night before she couldn’t sleep. Once on her seat she looked a bit apprehensive. She didn’t like the lights going down. For the first 10 minutes she looked so serious. As it’s for kids there’s audience participation which me and her dad joined in with enthusiastically (I don’t know why but you go back to being a four year old at these points) with her looking at us like we were mad. Then she sat forward and started clapping and joining in a little. Unsure still about what was the right thing to do.

I scooped her onto my knee and asked her a couple of questions which she quietly answered. Then we had to find the ladybird, you know the routine “she’s there!” “Where?” “THERE!” She forgot herself and started shouting “daddy it’s in the tree! Look” and relaxed. The songs were catchy, poo was mentioned which sent her into fits, she sidled back onto her own chair, sweets forgotten, totally enveloped in the magic. I watched her face, lit up with joy and I knew this was just the start. I knew I’d be asked when the next show was once it had finished. I watched her shout the answers, I watched her delight as the robbers got tricked and I watched her forget about everything except what was happening up there on the stage. I think I watched her more than the show. I got to experience this “first” through her eyes. It was magical.

I hope she remembers the things we do that are just for her. Her two brothers take up time, there’s always an appointment or something to do with them but I try to be fair and give her time too. It’s important that she feels just as special as her brothers. I don’t want her resenting the limitations we sometimes have as a family.

And we’ve booked to see stick man in December with Oliver this time too. Hopefully he will enjoy it as much as she did. Her grandad has got her a ticket to see the Gruffalos child with him and nana. I think you could say she has been bitten by the bug. 🐞

Xx

Butlins Skegness

We decided to have a holiday with the little ones and everyone said Butlins was worth a try as they had got so much out of it. So we booked and paid monthly for a gold apartment and the dining plan. We also paid an extra £15 for a ground floor apartment. Who needs the hassle of stopping another child trying to jump from a balcony (Max tried it in Florida)

I can see the appeal of Butlins. There’s a beach, small fairground, soft play and parks, food, shows and a water park all on site. However, once you get into the centre it’s very busy, there’s pound rides everywhere, lights, noise and an amusement arcade in the main pavilion. Not exactly brilliant for Oliver-total overload. He ran. A lot. We took turns chasing him whilst the other looked after Popples. Meal times were not a family affair. Day two I drove to the supermarket to get food in for breakfast and for Oliver and some Peroni for me and the hubs. I sent him for breakfasts with Popples because it was paid for, he eats more and I’m not too bothered about breakfast. It saved the morning stress of trying to keep Olly occupied whilst we tried to eat.

The activities we did were fun. The beach was a big hit, he was straight into the sea laughing and splashing up to his armpits. I built castles with Popples as she is more wary of water although I did get her in for a paddle. The fairground has a section for under 150cm so they could go on rides by themselves which they loved and it was included in the holiday price.

The water park had a selection of pools and water slides. We went on one of them and the kids actually queued no problem for it. Soft play killed a couple hours. The climbing frames killed another hour. We didn’t get to any shows. We ate in shifts. We hardly slept, a new place with all those things to do hyped them both up. I slept in “the girls room” as it was named by the youngest. Hubs and Olly slept in the double bed. At least we didn’t have to listen to the snoring!

Because Oliver didn’t eat much for two days we decided to go to the Italian on site. Not nice and cost a chunk. The main meals on the dining plan were passable, just, puddings were lovely though. We had taken stickle bricks and dvds for them which settled him a little in our apartment. Bed time was another challenge. She wandered in and out needing the toilet (fifty times an hour 🙄), he tried climbing out of the bedroom window. He wouldn’t go in the shower, couldn’t have bathroom light on as it was an extractor fan and the noise bothered him. Thankfully he couldn’t reach the security chain on the door or that would have been someone on duty all night.

It’s nothing we didn’t expect although I did think they’d be tired from the days exertions and sleep a bit more. We didn’t really see much of each other. We didn’t get any relaxing time. Before we went we talked about it and accepted that it was the kids holiday and to not expect too much and I think it helped keep our stress levels down. Instead of losing it at dinner I took him out for a walk while dad and sister finished tea. The next day he did the same for me.

The kids loved it. We made it about them telling Popples she could do what she wanted, giving her options and telling her that if she didn’t like it she didn’t have to do it. She cried when we went swimming but we had made the plan where if she didn’t like it I’d take her to do something else and we’d meet up later (very scared of big water) and told her that it was up to her to tell me if she didn’t like it. No worries once she got in and saw it only came up to her knees in the baby pool. She went on the big slide with us too. Her confidence grew because she was in charge wherever we could let her.

Butlins has more on offer but not for us. Climbing walls and stuff were not appropriate for us. Golf wasn’t either. So I can see why people love it and go back time and again but I think it’ll be a while if we go back. If we do at all. The request for next year is Peppa Pig World. She was only a baby when we took Oliver so we are considering it.

I think expecting so little and having strategies in place helped us get in the right mind set. We made some amazing memories. I took her on her first grown up fairground ride and got to see her face filled with joy and hear her laughter. I got to see my son laughing and splashing his dad in a very cold sea. I got to eat as many puddings as I wanted. I got to see my children squeeze everything they could out of family time. They loved it. And because they loved it, it was worth the no sleep, no relaxation, running around keeping him safe and every penny we spent.

Because she didn’t get to see a show we are taking her to the theatre tomorrow.

Butlins by the sea – ticks a lot of boxes but for a family like ours doesn’t tick quite enough…… yet.

Xx

Scarlet fever and antibiotics

Oliver had his birthday recently. He woke up with a red cheek and a cold. Thankfully it didn’t ruin his day, he opened presents, opened his cards and was quite social. By the time of birthday tea his other cheek was red. We put it down to sugar or an eczema flare up as he didn’t have a temperature and showed no other signs.

As he seemed fine I sent him to school as normal, explaining to the teacher about his lack of temperature but with the proviso they called if he showed any deterioration. He was fine at school, didn’t eat much but that’s not unusual. He refused his dinner, stopped drinking and went to bed and to sleep on his own! He slept through. The alarm bells were ringing when I woke at six and he was still asleep.

Rash had spread to his arms, got an emergency appointment as it seems scarlet fever and slap cheek is going around. The doctor checked him over and debated between the two possible diagnosis. After discussing his temperature which was over 38 last night and his reluctance to put anything in his mouth he decided to treat for scarlet fever. The lack of eating and drinking suggesting sore throat. The fact he had taken calpol the night before with no fight meant he felt rough. He had chicken pox a couple of weeks ago so we have been given antibiotics. Four times a day for ten days of the most disgusting medicine possible. As you can imagine, I’m thrilled.

Oliver does not like medicine. Took me months and many bottles to get him to take liquid paracetamol. Now I present him with this stuff. He understands “sore” and he knows when he has calpol he feels better. I think he thinks I’m trying to poison him with this stuff. I’ve put it in juice, he refuses to drink. I try to bribe with goodies if he takes it. I even resorted to pin him down and try to make him swallow but failed. He’s never had antibiotics before. The rash is now everywhere. With him having just had the pox, I’m more concerned than I usually would be over this, there can be an increase in other things like pneumonia so I need to find a way to get this down him. Usually if it meant that he could fight it on his own but would stay off school then I’d go with that, as exhausting as that is. He can go to school 24 hours after starting antibiotics but that’s not the reason I need him to take them. I’m terrified of complications because he isn’t a healthy eater or sleeper and his immune system is not the best so he’s a prime candidate for complications.

How do you explain to him that this will make him better when it’s so vile? We are hardwired not to eat “yuk”. I’ll try some in yoghurt later and see how that goes but why can’t someone make medicine that doesn’t taste like crap? It would make my life a little bit easier. I’ve tried the mummy has some/Oliver has some, in the hopes of reassuring him but he looked at me like I was mad. It can’t be just us who have this problem. I’m tired of being the bad guy when I’m just trying to help but that seems to be par for the course in this family at least.

Xx

“I don’t want to be your wife anymore”

Those were the words I finally had to speak to my husband a few weeks ago.  They were not said in anger, they were not the result of a row.  Since being married I feel he has become more secure, which is great, but I have felt less secure.  We stopped talking, he’d play on his phone of an evening when we were supposed to be watching a film, he’d come in from work and be on his phone, and yet when it came to him wanting to do something, we were all supposed to just be in good moods and grateful he wanted to spend time with us.  As you can imagine, feeling like a piece of furniture is not conducive to a great relationship so we did have a row about his phone and lack of interest and he said he’d try harder, especially with the kids, and he has.

I still didn’t feel right.  Instead of looking forward to him coming home, I dreaded it.  I hoped he’d have to go away for work more than I usually did and I decided that I needed to figure out what was going on in my head.  I don’t like doing that.  I usually bob along, making sure everyone is happy and that’s enough, except it’s not is it? Not really.  I file things away in my brain and don’t deal with them.  I’m not good about talking about my feelings either, it’s hard enough figuring out what I’m feeling, never mind explain it to someone else.  I was really unhappy.   He knew I was unhappy.  I kept talking about how I didn’t understand the world, how I never have understood it.  I don’t “get” people and their games, and why they lie, and why they don’t just say what they mean and I feel like I don’t belong to anything and never have done.  Except for my kids.  I fit with them.  They don’t have expectations of me in the same way.  They expect me to be there and look after them, obviously, but they don’t expect sparkling conversation or little amusing bon mots, I’m just there to be mum which I have done for, like, ever- so it’s something I know I can do.  Kids are easily amused, you just act daft and tell poo jokes.

And that’s when I knew what the problem was.  It’s the expectations that fill me with anxiety and unhappiness and the fact that I know I can’t fulfil those expectations.  I am not like most people, I am a nervy, anxious person and according to my husband very black and white about certain things like lying.  I don’t understand lying.  It drives me insane.  Why bother telling lies- you will get found out then trust will be broken and I will think you were trying to make a fool of me.  Ok you don’t have to be blunt but there’s nothing wrong with being honest.  Anyway, I’m going off the point.  The point is I can’t be the wife he expects, society expects and that I think everyone expects.  I couldn’t be the daughter, the sister, the girlfriend that was expected and I’m tired of failing.  So I told him I didn’t want to be his wife.  I told him if he wanted to go and find someone more “normal” he was welcome to, and I wouldn’t hold it against him and we’d make it work with the kids.  As I said, I am not good at expressing myself and the conversation went on for quite a while, as he was checking if I wanted to leave (no), if I was looking for someone else (no), if I was having another breakdown (no).  I just wanted to have my friend back who used to laugh with me, support me, have fun with me, talk nonsense with me, and all the other things we used to do.  I told him being a mum of 4 with each child having such great needs, and the lack of sleep meant I couldn’t be “a wife” the way he wanted.

Then he asked what I needed from him.  I told him I needed no pressure and I needed to know what he wanted.  He wants to be with me.  He wants us to stay a family.  He wants me to deal with everything that’s happened over the last 40 years, however long that takes, and he wants me to be happy.   He told me he didn’t give a **** what society expected.  He told me he always knew I wasn’t like everyone else, then proceeded to list all the ways in which I was different.  The list was quite extensive!  But, he said, I made life more interesting and challenged his ideas on lots of things and came at things from a different perspective.   Him being distant didn’t help our relationship but me being unhappy and maybe pushing him away definitely didn’t help.  Catch 22 situation.  So we are together, in that we are sharing the house and the children, but also back as friends.  Since our chat I feel relieved that he is willing to stand by me while I sort through my head and that he doesn’t expect me to change with regards my “oddness”.  I have found someone I don’t have to pretend with, pretending is exhausting.  I might get a chance to be myself.

I know this may have been a really selfish action, it’s all about me kind of thing, but I didn’t want him to stay and get nothing from it.  He’s allowed a life too.  I’ve told him he doesn’t have to do everything with me.  I’m not keen on going out so if he wants a night out with mates he can do it guilt free.  It’s a work in progress though as I’m not the only one in this relationship with issues.  Just as he has helped and supported me, I will do the same for him, when he’s ready.  We are happier now.  I don’t know how long it will last, I suspect our relationship will always have problems but I think we both feel a bit more confident broaching things with each other now.  If I was going to be with anyone, it would be him, we just have to define what “wife” means to us.  For the first time in a long time I feel a little bit optimistic about the future.  Just a little bit.

 

xx

Dr Ranj and Get Well Soon

Get Well Soon Dr Ranj with Jobi

Dr Ranj is a real doctor and he’s on all kinds of programmes but the only one we are interested in is Get Well Soon on Cbeebies.  He is a very smiley patient doctor who is visited by a whole range of puppet patients with a variety of ailments.  He listens to them, listens to their worries, talks about their illness and how to help it get better.  Simple premise yes, but until this programme overlooked in my opinion.  Children get poorly or have to have injections and have to go to a place that often smells funny and let a practical stranger look at them and are supposed to make sense of that.  Now I know we talk to our kids about trips to the doctor, dentist and others and can talk about getting better- but how many of us do it to a funky song and dance routine?!

Oliver has spent a lot of time being poked and prodded when going through diagnosis and then the genetic testing so as you can imagine he is mighty upset when he has to go to see the GP.  By the way our GP’s are fantastic, very patient and friendly.  It usually results in me saying what I think is wrong while he turns all the lights off and crawls under the examining table so he can’t be looked at.  At home we play with the medical kit regularly, the toy one obviously, and the little ones now know how to look in ears, eyes, take a blood pressure and give mummy 500 injections.  If I don’t say “Ouch” they do it until I do.  I hoped it would help with doctor visits.  Alongside this we started watching Cbeebies, we were Milkshake fans for a long time, and came across get well soon.  The kids were entranced.  It is colourful with lots of singing and not everyone is happy.  But it’s ok, they don’t have to be.  It’s ok to be scared and worried and sad that you’re ill.  And more importantly it’s ok to tell the doctor if you are feeling those things.  Dr Ranj explains without being patronising.  Watched a brilliant one on asthma.  My sons favourite is the ear infection though, the song made him giggle and he actually tried to join in the singing.  His version went “doctor, doctor, ear- OW!” which was close enough and he loved doing the OW! bit and dancing.  (the words are “go to see the doctor when your ear goes OW”) so pretty close.

Anyway he had to go, coincidentally with a suspected ear infection and although he didn’t like it much he was much better at being examined.  He let our doctor take his temp, look in his ears, listen to his chest, almost let him check his throat and suffered the pulse-ox finger monitor for 15 seconds which was brilliant.  Then he went and turned the lights off.  I understand that the NHS is under strain and GP’s are supposed to keep to 10 minute appointments but I have to say that mine never make me feel rushed and if I go in with a sick child, they take the time to talk to the child, explaining what they are doing and why.  I think it’s important that the child feels like they are involved, important and have some say.  When Popples had a hip infection, she was only just 3 but the doctor said to her “can I just put you up here on the bed and have a look at this poorly leg” which made her feel like she had a choice.  When he said to Oliver “can I see inside your mouth” he got a “No no no” so he didn’t push it (we weren’t overly concerned about his throat, it’s just if he sees him he likes to do as thorough a check up as possible as we don’t go that often) , but then got to listen to his chest.  It builds up trust and lessens the fear.  I think all doctors should watch get well soon, some of the ones we saw at hospital had no idea about children even though it was their specialty.  All I need now is for my GP to learn a few song and dance routines, although I suspect the kids would then be feigning illness in the hopes of seeing him everyday!  If you haven’t seen it, you should give it a go.  I should warn you though that the songs can get stuck in your head.

Until next time- Be happy, be healthy and get well soon!

xx